Two birds test positive for West Nile virus in British Columbia

Two birds test positive for West Nile virus in British Columbia

Since the beginning of 2018, four cases of EEEV infection in horses in Nassau County and one outbreak of EEEV in emus were reported.

What is West Nile virus? About one in 150 infected people will become severely ill, and may experience symptoms such as a stiff neck, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, muscle weakness, convulsions, or paralysis.

Details were scant, but City Manager Charlie Barrineau said the state Department of Health and Environmental Control notified local officials Thursday that a person located in the middle of the city tested positive for the mosquito-borne illness.

There have also been cases of mosquitos spreading the virus to horses and other animals, so horse owners are encouraged to contact their veterinarians for informations about equine vaccines. Heightened concerns over possible transmission to humans from both viruses, will continue into mid-October, until cooler temperatures start to significantly slow down both mosquito and virus activity.

There are things everyone can do to reduce the risk of West Nile virus infection.

Officials asked residents to remove any standing water on their property. Stagnant backyard pools can be a big source of mosquitoes and should be maintained regularly to prevent mosquito growth. Keep them outside by having tightly-fitting screens on all of your windows and doors. This is when mosquitoes that can carry the virus are most active.

Wear protective clothing. If you are in an area with many mosquitoes, wear loose fitting, light-coloured clothing, full-length trousers, and a long-sleeved shirt.

Be sure to apply mosquito repellent to bare skin. Use a repellent with DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, picaridin (KBR 3023), IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus [p-methane 3, 8-diol (PMD)] according to the instructions on the product label.

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